Complete Guide to

Driving With Disability

Welcome to your FREE Complete Guide to Driving with Disability. For many people with disability, being able to drive safely is empowering and transformative. Some people even describe it as life-changing … others lifesaving.


Whether you love to drive or would love to drive.

This Guide is for people who:

Are learning to drive for the first time.

Have acquired a disability and are now getting back to driving.

Are current drivers who could (maybe should) upgrade to new equipment.

Are people who have given up on the idea of driving, unaware new equipment may make it possible.

Technology has advanced so much in the last 10 years, giving you more choice and ability to drive. Products are more ergonomic; electronics are cutting edge and possibilities have become endless.

The Guide will take you through the 10 key steps

Step-by-step guide to get driving with the minimum of fuss.

Step 1: Preparation

2-4 weeks

Step 2: Key Contacts

2-4 weeks

Step 3: Getting Assessed

2-8 weeks (It takes longer for higher level assessments)

Step 4: Test Driving the Equipment

2-8 weeks (It takes longer for higher level assessments)

Step 5: The DTOT Report

2-4 weeks

Step 6: Driving Lessons

2 weeks - 12 months (due to van availability and/or cognitive challenges the high level mods need longer to learn)

Step 7: Doing the Driving Test

2-8 weeks (Covid has also delayed booking times with Transport Authorities)

Step 8: Ordering your Equipment / Modifications

2-8 weeks for private funding (Can be 3-12 months when subject to funding being approved)

Step 9: Installation and Certification

2-4 weeks (High level mods can take months to install with multiple suppliers)

Step 10: Equipment Aftercare and Longevity

1-4 weeks (Service should be conducted every 12-24 months depending on product)

Please note: the timeframes above are indicative only. In extreme cases the time for each step may be more or less than anticipated.

Madi De Rozario in driver seat with satellite accelerator from total Ability

“Taking preventative measures to protect my shoulders (by using the latest driving controls) is really important. Whether you’re an athlete or not, if you use a wheelchair, you need to prolong their use. Your shoulders are a vital part of maintaining your independence in so many aspects of life.”

Madison De Rozario, Gold Medallist at the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games